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Health & Exercise Science Major

Division of Professional Studies

A major in health and exercise science can prepare you for a variety of careers. Whether you want to focus on health promotion, strength and conditioning, physical therapy, kinesiology or research, your degree in health and exercise science can give you the options you need to develop the career of your choosing or pursue graduate study. Get started at Bridgewater College.

Health and Exercise Science Major

Advising Templates

Consists of 48 credit hours in the following courses:

Introduction to the biological sciences covering biological chemistry celltissue structure and function genetics and microevolution. Intended for biology health and human sciences and environmental science majors. Three lectures and one lab per week. Corequisites
Real numbers exponents radicals and algebraic operations with polynomial and rational functions. Solving equations and graphing expressions involving polynomial and rational functions and exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit may not be received for both MATH 118 and 110. General education master core skill 2016 Summer Session I offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3
or
This course is designed to provide development of basic computational skills and introductory algebra concepts like solutions of single variable equations. It will also cover some introductory statistics and probability concepts. Problem solving will be emphasized. The course will contain at least one project that requires students to make extensive use of spreadsheet software like Excel. General Education Master Core Skill

Unit(s): 3
Biology and environmental science majors should take
Real numbers exponents radicals and algebraic operations with polynomial and rational functions. Solving equations and graphing expressions involving polynomial and rational functions and exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit may not be received for both MATH 118 and 110. General education master core skill 2016 Summer Session I offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3
. Other students should consult with their advisor about which course to take. General Education natural and physical sciences

Unit(s): 4

Exploration of contemporary issues in the field of health and exercise science including exposure to a variety of career opportunities some of which include athletic training exercise physiology fitness physical therapy occupational therapy and recreation.

Unit(s): 3

Exploration of basic nutritional requirements for active individuals and the relationship of proper nutrition to increased health and human performance. Topics include how nutrients (e.g. carbohydrates proteins) can influence exercise performance appropriate ways to manage weight and evaluation of the role of ergogenic aids in human performance.

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to the structure and function of the human body examining the skeletal muscular circulatory nervous digestive respiratory urinary and reproductive systems. Lecture focuses on topics of physiologyfunction histology and their relation to anatomical structure while the lab focuses on descriptive anatomy. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites BIOL 110 or permission of instructor 2016 Summer Session I Begins 5-23-16

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the physiology of the human body including the physiology of enzymes and membranes tissue physiology (nervous muscular) and a detailed survey of the physiology of the major organ systems. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites BIOL 111 or BIOL 110 and 305 Credit may not be received for both BIOL 311 and 314

Unit(s): 4

Examination of the function of the human musculoskeletal system. Selected musculoskeletal structures and their functions as well as analysis of movements as they relate to physical activity exercise and sport. Prerequisites BIOL 305 or ES 318

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the multiple determinants of health and wellness from a personal and community perspective. Through service-based learning experiences students critically analyze individual social and environmental factors that influence health. This course requires students to spend time off-campus serving at community agencies in order to successfully fulfill course requirements. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 ENG 110 and ES-230 or permission of the instructor Experiential learning and writing intensive

Unit(s): 3

Basic physiological concepts of the nervous muscular and energy systems including the effect of exercise on such functions as circulation respiration and temperature regulation. Prerequisites BIOL 305 or ES 318

Unit(s): 3

Concepts of administration such as devising policy and procedures record-keeping budgeting facility design risk management and productivity standards for healthcare professionals.

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Capstone experience integrating the core learned in major level courses through readings class discussions and projects. Additionally skill application occurs by completing 75 hours of competency-based work in an environment relevant to the discipline and reflecting upon this experience in light of their knowledge and skill development. Prerequisites senior Health and Exercise Science majors or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to the role psychology plays in physical education and sport settings. Exploration of how psychological factors (e.g. personality achievement motivation anxiety) can influence participation in physical activity and motor performance how the structure of sport and physical education programs influence psychological development and how teaching mental skills (e.g. arousal regulation goal setting visualization) may enhance motor performance in physical education and sport. Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
ENG 110 Writing intensive

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Examination of the mental health benefits of exercise as well as motivational factors involved in exercise and the many variables that influence exercise behavior (e.g. stress emotional states anxiety and depression). Additionally this course explores the psychological antecedents and consequences of injury and illness.

Unit(s): 3

Capstone experience integrating the core learned in major level courses through readings class discussions and projects. Additionally skill application occurs by completing 75 hours of competency-based work in an environment relevant to the discipline and reflecting upon this experience in light of their knowledge and skill development. Prerequisites senior Health and Exercise Science majors or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

And 12 additional credit hours from the following courses:

Expands on several topics introduced in BIOL 305. Lecture explores how clinical tests and drug therapies are used to evaluate medical conditions associated with the cardiovascular respiratory urinary and nervous systems while the lab provides students with a more in-depth examination of skeletal and muscular anatomy. Prerequisite BIOL 305

Unit(s): 3

Introduces a variety of business principles and practices as a foundation for students majoring in Business Administration and for non-business majors interested in acquiring basic understanding of the business world. Addresses aspects of leadership and personal assessment and development through a semester-long business plan project helping students to assess their interest in and aptitude for various business disciplines.

Unit(s): 3

Explores the principles and practices of how goods services and ideas are developed and distributed in order to satisfy individual and organization needs wants and objectives. Emphasis is placed on the micro-marketing perspectives including product price promotion and place. Prerequisites BUS 120 and COMM 100 or permission of instructor ECON 210 recommended but not required

Unit(s): 3

Overview of the functional groups and reactivity of organic molecules using biological examples. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour lab per week. Prerequisites CHEM 125 or 162 Credit may not be received for both CHEM 250 and 305

Unit(s): 4

Examines the role of news advocacy scientific analysis decision and policy making risk perception and other factors in the communication of issues related to science environment and health. Provides students with rich theoretical background critical understanding and practical skills to produce investigate and critique communication processes related to the topics. Students in this course are required to conduct field work and original research write and publish news and analytical articles. Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to research process including formulating research questions research methods general statistical evaluation presentation and research ethics. MATH 140 recommended but not required.

Unit(s): 3

Fundamentals of administering first aid in all its aspects with attention to the prevention and treatment of athletic injuries. Emphasis on general safety procedures surrounding activities of school college and community environments. Estimated Extra Cost 2015 Interterm 125

Unit(s): 3

Practical experience in evaluation of physical fitness and its application to the implementation of safe and effective exercise training programs.

Unit(s): 3

Administration of school health and exercise science programs including health instruction environmental services and curriculum content. Methods and materials used in teaching health and exercise science as well as experiences in unit structure and application are covered. Prerequisites ES 300WX and EDUC 215

Unit(s): 3

Preparation in scientifically sound principles of conditioning in professional settings including in-depth study of strength training speed development cardiovascular training flexibility training and exercise program design. Principles and concepts derived from physiology psychology anatomy and kinesiology are practically applied. Application of principles of training to all populations including those with special needs and athletes. Prerequisites ES 320

Unit(s): 3

Examination of human movement from the perspectives of motor learning motor development and motor control. The basic psychological learning principles and theories apply to the acquisition of motor skills and factors which may influence skill learning are identified as is physical growth and development as related to motor performance across the lifespan.

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the theoretical bases of treatment goals appropriate therapeutic modality selection application and assessment of the treatment response that is required for the successful integration of therapeutic modalities into the athletic training practice. Identification of theoretical foundations (physiology physics and safety) for appropriate decision-making in the selection of the appropriate therapeutic modality including appropriate psychomotor skills for pre-treatment assessment treatment set-up modality application and assessment of treatment response and appropriate documentation. Prerequisites ES 351 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 4

Development of rehabilitation programs for individuals recovering from injury. Upon identification of theoretical and practical approach for the design of rehabilitation protocols and the use of available rehabilitation equipment including specific parameters for providing exercise and rehabilitation recommendations for people encountering special disease illness or injury states. Prerequisites ES 351 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 4

Examination of the field of Adapted Physical Education. Exposure to recreational needs and capabilities of people with disabilities is provided. Practical experience in working with the special populations as well as orientation to wheelchair sports. Off campus laboratory experience required.

Unit(s): 3

Development of community based intervention strategies to modify health risk behaviors with emphasis on theoretical foundations and comprehensive program planning strategies.

Unit(s): 3

This course is meant to be a practical application of the material covered in ES 427 Health Promotion and Wellness. Students who have previously completed ES 427 will then implement the health program they developed and do preliminary measurements on its effectiveness. These interventions strategies will be community-focused to achieve behavioral changes in at-risk populations. Prerequisites ES 427

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs by the first day of the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester the supervising professor files with the Registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

Unit(s): 3

-or-
An Honors Project is one in which a student researches a subject by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an Honors Project. One desiring to pursue an Honors Project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs by the first day of the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the conclusion of the Honors Project the supervising professor files with the Registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished and with the Library Director a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work. It is the students responsibility to provide the materials for the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The Library Director arranges for binding and storage.

Unit(s): 3

Basic nutrition concepts nutrition needs throughout the life cycle and current nutrition issues.

Unit(s): 3

Examine issues related to geriatrics with emphasis on issues including historical cultural biological physiological psychological and social contexts. Opportunities for experiential learning in residential and intermediate facilities with appropriate agencies. Prequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 Experiential learning

Unit(s): 3

A study of the effects of nutrition on the well being of the athlete and the relationship of good nutrition to optimum performance. Prerequisite FCS 240

Unit(s): 3

Basic descriptive statistics probability hypothesis testing correlation and regression. Statistical computer software is used to analyze data. Prerequisites MATH 118 MATH 110 MATH 115 or satisfactory performance on placement test

Unit(s): 3

Pressing issues confronting professionals in a technological era. Utilizing the insights of philosophical and religious ethics the course examines the responsibilities of the professional person in business medicine law education the ministry and other fields. Problems considered include confidentiality accountability whistleblowing governmental regulation and ethical codes. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 ENG 110 and junior or senior standing General Education philosophy or religion Ethical Reasoning Course

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Confronts a number of modern scientific and ethical problems including abortion genetic testing genetically modified plants and animals stem cells gene therapy research on humans and physician-assisted suicide. Biology and biotechnology often confound our notions of right and wrong and what ethical behavior is. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education philosophy or religion and Ethical Reasoning Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Empirical findings related to the description classification assessment etiology and treatments of various psychological disorders. Specific disorders examined include anxiety disorders mood disorders substance-related disorders personality disorders and schizophrenia. An important emphasis is understanding the impact of mental illness on individuals and their family and friends. Prerequisite PSY 101 or SOC 101 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

Surveys historical approaches basic issues recent research and current theoretical perspectives in developmental psychology. Emphasis on describing and explaining the changes that characterize physical perceptual cognitive social and emotional development across the lifespan. Prerequisite PSY 101 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

This major introduces students to the sub-disciplines of health and exercise science, providing students with a sound preparation upon which to develop a career or to pursue graduate study in the discipline.

Careers and Graduate Schools

What can you do with a degree in health and exercise science?

Like the department’s recent graduates, you might enter graduate schools such as:

  • College of Charleston
  • University of Delaware
  • Delta State University
  • University of Florida
  • Georgia Southern University
  • James Madison University
  • Louisiana Tech University
  • University of Maryland‑Baltimore County
  • University of Maryland‑Eastern Shore
  • Mississippi State University
  • North Carolina State University
  • Northwestern State University
  • Old Dominion University
  • Shenandoah University
  • University of Virginia
  • Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Virginia Tech

Or pursue a career as:

  • Adapted Physical Education Supervisor
  • Athletic Director
  • Coach
  • Medical Interpreter
  • Nutrition Specialist
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Personal Trainer
  • Physical Therapist
  • Physician (MD or DO)
  • Physician Assistant
  • Principal
  • Recreation Specialist
  • Recreation Therapist
  • Sports League Manager
  • Strength and Conditioning Specialist
  • Teacher

Learn more about career paths, employment and advancement in a variety of Health and Human Sciences fields on the Career and Professional Resources page.

Visit the Department Homepage

Questions? Contact Us!

Jill Lassiter, Associate Professor
540-828-5416
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